DC Chess Eaglemoss 48 Aquaman white rook

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egldcchs_48
$15.00
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Resin figurine. Please ask seller for the magazine.
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Magazine on demand, free of charge if we have it. Always shipped with original box.
Aquaman (Arthur Curry) is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. Created by Paul Norris and Mort Weisinger, the character debuted in More Fun Comics #73 (November 1941).[1] Initially a backup feature in DC's anthology titles, Aquaman later starred in several volumes of a solo comic book series. During the late 1950s' and 1960s' superhero-revival period known as the Silver Age, he was a founding member of the Justice League. In the 1990s' Modern Age, writers interpreted Aquaman's character more seriously, with storylines depicting the weight of his role as king of Atlantis.[2]

The character's original 1960s animated appearances left a lasting impression, making Aquaman widely recognized in popular culture and one of the world's most recognized superheroes. Jokes about his wholesome, weak portrayal in Super Friends and perceived feeble powers and abilities have been staples of comedy programs and stand-up routines,[3][4][5] leading DC at several times to attempt to make the character edgier or more powerful in comic books.[6] Modern comic book depictions have attempted to reconcile these various aspects of his public perception, with many versions often casting Aquaman as serious and brooding, saddled with an ill reputation, and struggling to find a true role and purpose beyond his public side as a deposed king and a fallen hero.[7]

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